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Reshaping Financial Services IT: CIO Best Practices for the Shift Toward Mobile Speakers: Dr. Larry Ponemon, Chairman, Ponemon Institute Ojas Rege, VP Strategy, MobileIron Session Times: April 1st 8:00 AM PDT (San Francisco) / 4:00 PM BST (London) April 2nd 9:00 AM HKT (Hong Kong) / 6:00 PM PDT (San Francisco)    Widespread consumer adoption of mobile technology has set in motion a fundamental shift within financial services organizations. CIOs are learning to leverage the power of mobility to deliver a strategic business advantage by helping their firms become more efficient and flexible. For the first time, MobileIron will share data from a Ponemon Institute survey of 400 financial services organizations about the future of BlackBerry, BYOD, apps, and governance. Join MobileIron VP of Strategy Ojas Rege and Ponemon Institute Chairman and Founder Dr. Larry Ponemon for a practical and “eyes-wide-open” look at the issues CIOs and CISOs in financial services will need to address as mobile becomes a fundamental part of their computing environment. Key topics include: • Financial services mobile adoption forecasts • Trends in migration to multi-OS environments • Dependencies for successful mobile strategy deployment • Implications of user experience and security Register Now This session will be recorded and available for replay.

 

Ponemon Study Shows the Cost of a Data Breach Continues to Increase

Ponemon Study Shows the Cost of a Data Breach Continues to Increase

Fifth annual survey shows a significant spike in legal defense spending while breaches involving third-party organizations remained the most costly

Fifth annual survey shows a significant spike in legal defense spending while breaches involving third-party organizations remained the most costly.

Fifth annual survey shows a significant spike in legal defense spending while breaches involving third-party organizations remained the most costly

MENLO PARK, Calif. and TRAVERSE CITY, Mich., Jan. 25 /PRNewswire/ -- PGP Corporation, a global leader in enterprise data protection, and the Ponemon Institute, a privacy and information management research firm, today announced results of the fifth annual U.S. Cost of a Data Breach Study. According to the study, data breach incidents cost U.S. companies $204 per compromised customer record in 2009, compared to $202 in 2008. Despite an overall drop in the number of reported breaches (498 in 2009 vs. 657 in 2008 according to the Identity Theft Resource Center), the average total per-incident costs in 2009 were $6.75 million, compared to an average per-incident cost of $6.65 million in 2008.

The annual U.S. Cost of Data Breach Study tracks a wide range of cost factors, including expensive outlays for detection, escalation, notification and response along with legal, investigative and administrative expenses, customer defections, opportunity loss, reputation management, and costs associated with customer support such as information hotlines and credit monitoring subscriptions.  

Other key findings from the study include the following:

  • The cost of a data breach as the result of malicious attacks and botnets were more costly and severe.    
  • Negligent insider breaches have decreased in number and cost most likely resulting from training and awareness programs having a positive affect on employees' sensitivity and awareness about the protection of personal information. Additionally, 58 percent have expanded their use of encryption up from 44 percent last year.
  • Organizations are spending more on legal defense costs which can be attributed to increasing fears of successful class actions resulting from customer, consumer or employee data loss.
  • Average abnormal churn rates across all incidents in the study were slightly higher than last year (from 3.6 percent in 2008 to 3.7 percent in 2009), which was measured by the loss of customers who were directly affected by the data breach event (i.e., typically those receiving notification). The industries with the highest churn rate were pharmaceuticals, communications and healthcare (all at 6 percent), followed by financial services and services (both at 5 percent).
  • Third-party organizations accounted for 42 percent of all breach cases, dropping from 44 percent of all cases in 2008. These remain the most costly form of data breaches due to additional investigation and consulting fees.
  • The most expensive data breach event included in this year's study cost a company nearly $31 million to resolve.  The least expensive total cost of data breach for a company included in the study was $750,000.

"In the five years we have conducted this study, we have continued to see an increase in the cost to businesses for suffering a data breach," said Dr. Larry Ponemon, chairman and founder of The Ponemon Institute. "With a variety of threat vectors to contend with, companies must proactively implement policies and technologies that mitigate the risk of facing a costly breach."

The study, sponsored by PGP Corporation and independently conducted by the Ponemon Institute, takes into account a wide range of business costs, including expense outlays for detection, escalation, notification, and after the fact (ex-post) response.  The study also analyzes the economic impact of lost or diminished customer trust and confidence, measured by customer churn or turnover rates.

"As breaches are becoming all too commonplace, U.S. businesses can't afford to ignore protecting the valuable, sensitive data they have been entrusted with," said Phillip Dunkelberger, president and CEO of PGP Corporation. "Our study with the Ponemon Institute continues to demonstrate that companies whose data is not protected are not only facing expensive direct costs from cleaning up a data breach, but also a loss in customer confidence that has long lasting ramifications."

The U.S. Cost of a Data Breach Study was derived from a detailed analysis of 45 data breach cases with a range of approximately 5,000 to 101,000 records that were affected. The study found that there is a positive correlation between the number of records lost and the cost of an incident. Companies analyzed were from 15 different industries, including financial, retail, healthcare, services, education, technology, manufacturing, transportation, consumer, hotels and leisure, entertainment, marketing, pharmaceutical, communications, research, energy and defense.